At last: the NHS acts on maternal mental health

Good news: in the next five years, NHS England will create 20 new specialist treatment centres for women who suffer from mental health problems during pregnancy or after birth.

This has been a long time coming. For years the government has promised to address the poor quality of mental health care for new mothers, and finally it’s putting its money where its mouth is. Admittedly it’s not very much money – the centres will be funded to the tune of £40m, which is unlikely to cope with the scale of the problem: an estimated one in five new mothers (about 120,000 women a year) experience mental health problems.

The majority of these women suffer from postnatal depression, but a substantial minority will have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The most conservative estimate for PTSD after childbirth is 1.5% (about 10,000 women a year in England and Wales), but researchers now think that the true figure is probably double that. PTSD can’t be cured with a pill: treatment, usually trauma-focused CBT or eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR) takes several weeks, and is expensive.

Having spoken to many women suffering from postnatal PTSD, I know that it can be hard to find specialist help. It’s not unusual for women to have to wait months for treatment, during which time they suffer the stress of flashbacks, nightmares, anxiety and terror. They are often frightened to leave the house and avoid contact with other new babies, making them isolated on top of everything else. All of these things have an impact on their relationship with their baby and with their partner. It’s not surprising that ­– according to the Guardian report of the NHS’s plans – perinatal mental health problems cost the UK £8.1bn a year.

So while I welcome the new centres as a step in the right direction, much more needs to be done to make sure that women with PTSD and other mental health problems receive the support they require. Even more importantly, I would love the NHS work towards preventing these mental health problems from arising in the first place. Most women with postnatal PTSD believe that it was caused, not solely by a traumatic birth, but by the feelings of helplessness and lack of control during the experience, and by the casual and sometimes even cruel attitude of healthcare professionals looking after them.

Some of this can be addressed by better recruitment and better staff training. But the NHS also needs to adopt rigorous standards of care that hold health professionals accountable: making sure that procedures aren’t carried out on women without their consent, for example, or that women are denied necessary pain relief. In a 21st century health service, in a wealthy democracy these things shouldn’t be difficult, but the stories I hear from traumatised women about poor care show we still have a very long way to go.

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