Breaking the silence – why we need birth trauma awareness week

Next week – August 14 to 18 – is birth trauma awareness week. It has two main aims. One is to make more people aware of what birth trauma is and how it affects women (and their families) who experience it.

The other aim is to raise money so that the Birth Trauma Association can start extending its services to women by offering peer support by phone and face-to-face.

If you’re interested in helping, there are a few things you can do:

  • Tweet links to women’s birth stories using the hashtag #BreakTheSilence
  • Hold a fundraising event – you can download a fundraising pack for ideas
  • Follow the Birth Trauma Association on Twitter
  • Change your social media profile pic to include the Birth Trauma Association logo
  • Register with Thunderclap to post a message about birth trauma awareness on your timeline at 5pm on Monday 14th – the more people who register, the more impact the message will have

It’s long been clear that there’s a huge unmet need for support services for women suffering from birth trauma. Although it’s hard to know the exact number, the current best guess is that 20,000 women every year suffer from postnatal PTSD in the UK (3% of the total number of women giving birth).

One of the reasons the condition is little known about is because women don’t speak about it. And the reason they don’t speak about it is that people don’t listen. Women are used to hearing the dismissive phrase: “All that matters is that you have a healthy baby.”

Two weeks ago, blogger Sarah Oakes wrote a post called: I had a shit birth. Here’s six reasons why I really want others to know.

It’s a wonderful, eloquent, powerful piece about what it’s like to experience birth trauma. Within a matter of days, it had received 90,000 hits, having been shared on Facebook parenting groups, midwife groups and birth groups. Sarah brilliantly describes how women with birth trauma are silenced, about how dignity and respect are neglected in birth and how it feels to experience the constant hypervigiliance of PTSD: “The triggers are many and they are everywhere. A letter for a smear test, a shadow flickering past the window when you’re alone in the house at night. Shouting. The baby crying. It can all trigger symptoms – feelings of fear and threat – reducing a mother’s ability to parent well.”

The reason Sarah’s post was shared so often was because it resonated with so many women. They read it, thinking, Yes, that’s how I felt. That’s what it was like for me.

If you want to know why birth trauma is important, then read Sarah’s post. It’s time women’s stories were heard. It’s time to #BreakTheSilence.