The drug that could cut deaths from postpartum haemorrhage by a third

Every year, about 100,000 women die from haemorrhage after childbirth. Most of these deaths are in poorer countries such as Somalia or Sierra Leone where many give birth at home, without access to medical care. Even women who haemorrhage in hospital may still die, though sometimes doctors will perform a life-saving hysterectomy.

In Western countries, although postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is relatively common (in England, 13.8% of women haemorrhage after childbirth), most women who need it will receive an instant blood transfusion. Deaths from PPH are rare.

So it’s extremely good news that a new trial has shown that administering a simple, cheap drug called tranexamic acid, which works by stopping blood clots from breaking down, could potentially save the lives of about a third of women who currently die from PPH. The study was carried out by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in collaboration with 193 hospitals in Africa and Asia.

The most extraordinary part of this story is that tranexamic acid was discovered in the 1960s by a Japanese husband-and-wife research team, Shosuke and Utako Okamoto. They were unable to persuade doctors to perform a clinical trial, so the drug has mostly been used as a treatment for heavy periods and to reduce bleeding as a result of trauma.The WHO currently recommends its use for PPH as a second line treatment if the first line treatment of uteronics (drugs to contract the uterus) fails. This new research shows its efficacy as a first line treatment.

Even though its impact will be smaller, it is also good news for women in developed countries. Many women who suffer from PTSD after childbirth trace it back to their experience of severe PPH, and the terror of believing they were about to die. If administering tranexamic acid eventually becomes standard practice to reduce haemorrhage, then for those women, birth will become a less frightening experience.

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